Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia

By Bansari Pujara

Architecture has always been a way to glorify emotions and milestones. It is an art form that can be materialized over and over, even after its demolition in a different way each time. With each devastation it undergoes, a new story resonates with it. It tells the tale of the culture it belongs, the technology that went in building it and also the ideals on which the society is standing. To one's surprise of lack of technology, the traditional architecture has survived over thousands of years in one form or another, citing Hagia Sophia as the best example.

The Hagia Sophia, or Ayasofya in Turkish, evidently involves the most unmistakable spot on the huge horizon of Turkey's biggest city, Istanbul, the spanning city among Asia and Europe. This Haghia Sophia dates to be around 1478 years old, even though it is not the oldest monument, it has endured its fair share of earthquakes throughout history. Its architecture, ambience, as well as the age size, makes it a monument out of a mystical fairytale. It was erected as a Christian place of worship in 4th century A.D. Hagia Sophia had turned into the mother church of Greek Orthodox worshippers, the fundamental and official Byzantine religion. In this manner, the area was utilized for crowning liturgy functions of the empire's rulers.

What stands today on the site isn't the first and unique Hagia Sophia structure, yet its second, more-than-simply sublime, substitution. After Mehmed the Conqueror's Muslim armed force broke the city walls in 1453, it was changed over into a royal mosque, and filled in as pride of place under the Ottoman rule for very nearly five centuries from that point.

Haghia Sophia translates to Holy Wisdom, having been named after the Christ and been demolished and rebuilt as a mosque, it is revered by both Christians and Muslims as their own. It is not just a shrine of aesthetics but also of religion, politics and international affairs. 

The Hagia Sophia was used as a church for about 916 years and as a mosque for 481 years. In 1934, by command of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk and the agreement of the Council of Ministers, it was transformed over into a museum and from that point forward, has been available to guests with a large number of individuals visiting the former church-turned-mosque site.