PCOS - PolyCystic Ovary Syndrome

PCOS - PolyCystic Ovary Syndrome

PCOS - PolyCystic Ovary Syndrome

By Bansari Pujara

Women go through the menstrual cycle every month, since the onset of their puberty. Menstruation is a part of what a woman is, ovaries, and hormones are a major key factors in the functioning of a woman on a day to day basis. From period cramps to mood swings, a woman has to deal with everything. On top of that, if one suffers from Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), there are completely different and more horrid experiences will be faced by her.
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that influences a lady's hormone levels. It is named so on the account of the finding of enlarged ovaries containing numerous small cysts (polycystic ovaries).

A relatively common hormonal disorder, it causes varying symptoms in women of reproductive age. The common symptoms with PCOS are an irregularity in the menstrual cycle and the presence of surplus male hormones, also known as androgens. The unevenness of these androgens makes a woman skirt menstrual periods and makes it harder for them to get pregnant. PCOS additionally causes hair development on the face and body, known as hirsutism. But is known to have been the reason for baldness as well. 

Because of the absence or reduction in ovulation, women with PCOS have reduced levels of the hormone progesterone. This results in growth stimulation of the endometrium, which is the lining tissues of the uterus, leading to a dysfunctional uterine bleeding and breakthrough bleeding. The increased stimulation of the endometrium in the absence of progesterone production is hazardous for the development of endometrial hyperplasia and uterine cancer. What's more, it can add to long haul medical issues like diabetes and coronary illness. Insulin resistance, weight gain and even obesity are the few effects that occur most commonly in women having PCOS.

Even though the cause of this syndrome still quite unclear, the clarity remains in the fat that women suffering through it have to not just fight the battle with the disease but also with the social construct. From the public scrutiny and questions about the “womanhood” and “fertility status” of the woman often leads the woman over the bridge into depression. 

The pain of the disease is often less than the pain of being misunderstood and being treated badly for a condition that they have no control over. It is high time that empathy be engrained in everyone and this issue be addressed and be normalised.