Save A Reef Called Corals

Save A Reef Called Corals

Save A Reef Called Corals

By Gayatri Pande

97% of earth is covered by water out of which majority is seawater. Hence, marine life has a great impact on the earth's ecosystem. The most prominent and adorable element of this marine life is Coral Reef. Coral Reefs are the intricate designed, perfect image of beauty deep down the sea. Those are formed from individual called polyps. Polyps have a mutual relationship with algae. They both are dependant on each other. Polyps provide sunlight to algae whereas algae produce food and shares it with polyps. 

Even though coral reef comprises just 0.01% of the ecosystem, 25% of the marine life is dependant on the corals. Coral Reefs act as feeding grounds for most of the aquatic animals. Corals are much useful for humans as well. It proves to be a beneficial ingredient against the deadly disease like cancer and HIV/AIDS. Also, attractive colours and beauty attracts many tourists. Many tourist dives into the sea to see this natural grace. But these elegant beauty is on its way to demolish.

Overexploitation, dynamite fishing, global warming and natural disaster has turned to be a great threat. These corals are harvested and made as a material to showcase. In dynamite fishing or blast fishing, explosive material stun in oceans killing schools of fish and destroying the coral habitat. This destroys the calcium carbonate layer of corals resulting in continual degradation of them. Experts find dynamite fishing as one of the leading cause for destruction of corals. Global warming also adversely affects corals. Hotter the planet, warmer the water, more disruption of reef. Natural Disaster such as earthquakes and tsunamis are some of the other harmful events. Polluted water also causes coral reefs to bleach.

Many efforts are undertaken to preserve corals reefs. Gamete cryopreservation has acted as a key feature to protect coral reefs. This method involves freezing polyps to the point where they can stay alive for hundreds of year. It also consist of coral reproduction creating a whole other life from single coral. Another effort done is to grow threatened species under very strict lab conditions and when grown to a mature level, they are returned back to oceans. An example of these is the Smithsonian National Zoo, which grew 12,000 microscopic elkhorn coral in 2007 and returned them back in 2012. Still, there is a need for more reliable and more promising approach to protect and regain coral reefs. and then, we can say we saved a reef called coral!